Getting to know some new members of our SCOTS PGC community

Ms Amy Woodgate | Head of Junior and Middle Schools

This semester, we have welcomed a number of new faces into our SCOTS PGC community.  Across the College, new students have entered our classrooms as both day and boarding students.  They are students who have travelled far to be here, from various parts of Queensland, over the border in New South Wales and from places closer to home in Warwick.  We have also welcomed a new staff member in our English department who is returning to our region.

This point in the term is the perfect time to check in with how our new SCOTS PGC community members are settling in to life at the College.  Some of our Middle School leaders have spent time with a few of our new friends, chatting about where they have come from, what their first impressions of SCOTS PGC are and what they are most looking forward to.

We often talk about ‘the people’ being what makes SCOTS PGC special and I think you will be able to see this run as a theme through the responses shared. Enjoy getting to know them all a little better through the interviews below.

 

Darcy Noller and Nicholas Edmed

Interview 1: Darcy Noller (Middle School Leader) and Nicholas Edmed (Year 7 Day Student)

Darcy – Where is home?

Nicholas– I live in Woodenbong, just over the border in New South Wales

Darcy – What school did you go to before coming to SCOTS?

Nicholas– I went to Woodenbong Central State School.

Darcy – Why did you decide to come to SCOTS?

Nicholas– More opportunities, and better people

Darcy – What subjects or activities are you looking forward to taking part in?

Nicholas– I really like Ag, Tech, and PE.

Darcy – What has been the best part of your time at SCOTS so far?

Nicholas– Making new friends

 

Molly-Rose Sinclair and Isabelle Twidale

Interview 2: Isabelle Twidale (Middle School Leader) and Molly-Rose Sinclair |Year 8 Boarder)

Isabelle – Where is home?

Molly-Rose – I live west of Condamine.

Isabelle – What school did you do before coming to SCOTS?

Molly-Rose – I went to Brisbane School of Distance Education (home-school).

Isabelle – Why did you decide to come to SCOTS?

Molly-Rose – I decided to come to SCOTS as they have a good Tech program and I can bring my horse to school with me.

Isabelle – What activities are you looking forward to taking part in?

Molly-Rose – I would like to start to play more netball, rugby and ride more horses.

Isabelle – What has been the best part of your time at SCOTS so far?

Molly-Rose – I have really liked making new friends and I am learning way more here than at my old school.

Isabelle – What are you favourite subjects at school?

Molly-Rose – My favourite subjects at school are Science and HPE.

 

Lily Nolan, Maggie Myer & Tiarna Darragh

Interview 3: Maggie Myer (Middle School Leader) with Lily Nolan and Tiarna Darragh (Year 1)

Maggie –  What school did you go to before SCOTS?

LilyGlennie Heights State School

Tiarna – Killarney State School

Maggie –  What are your favorite things to do here at school?

Lily – Skipping, sport, friends, teachers, learning, playing in cubby house and gardening.

Tiarna – Playing with people, making new friends, skipping, playground, riding horses and gardening.

Maggie –  What has been the best thing/s about year 1 at SCOTS?

Lily – The teachers and meeting new people.

Tiarna – Learning, changing desks, the carpet, the teachers, and students.

Maggie –  What is your favorite part about lunch?

Lilysandwiches

Tiarna – Cake and nice food

Maggie –  Do you know what you want to be when you grow up?

Lily –  A vet

Tiarna – Vet/show jumper/horse trainer

 

Ms Sally Pirie

Interview 4 – Alyxis McDonald (Middle School Leader) and Ms Sally Pirie (English Faculty staff member)

Alyxis – What was the first school you attended when you were growing up, and what made that school special to you?

Ms Pirie – In my senior years from grade 8 to 12, I attended Fairholme College in Toowoomba. It was special to me for many reasons but mainly because of the friends that I made at school who have remained lifelong friends and have continued to be very supportive throughout my life journeys.

Alyxis – What was your favourite subject while you attended school?

Ms Pirie – Throughout my time at school my favourite subject was without a doubt, PE although I enjoyed all of them.

Alyxis – When you came to SCOTS for your interview, what was your first impression?

Ms Pirie – SCOTS is a beautiful school. It’s really set amongst what you could almost refer to as a village, and it gives off a vibe that’s really welcoming and warm.  The aura that it has is really, really lovely from the moment you walk in here. I find it very quiet so even when the students are here it is very quiet and the school is really spacious which is brilliant to have at a school.

Alyxis – What makes SCOTS different from other schools?

Ms Pirie – What makes SCOTS different from other schools is that it really feels like a community all on its own and it genuinely feels like the SCOTS community is here to support you and help you through any of your challenges whether they be physical, mental, or reoccurring. Coming to SCOTS, I have been really supported by staff, people in my faculty, the heads of the school and the leadership team who are all constantly checking in on me to make sure that I don’t need anything or that I am ok to find things. I have just felt really supported the whole way through and it has been a really nice journey.

Alyxis – What are your hobbies outside of school; what do you enjoy to do?

Ms Pirie My favourite hobby is definitely riding my horse, and I find it quite therapeutic to go for horse rides in the afternoons when I have time, and spending time with my friends and family.

Alyxis – Why is SCOTS a school that children should endeavour to come to?

Ms Pirie SCOTS has always had a long standing reputation as a great school with a great education and from a boarding perspective the opportunity to network with others. So getting out of our small communities and rural communities coming to a school like SCOTS gives you the opportunity to build lifelong friendships.  Some of the lifelong friendships that I made at school were through the boarding activities with students who attended SCOTS and they have stayed friends with me until this day. So if you have been given the opportunity to be a part of SCOTS’ rich history and its genuine community feel, you will shortly see that it really does give you a place and community that you will always belong to for the rest of your life.

College Photo Days – Monday 31 August & Tuesday 1 September featured image

College Photo Days – Monday 31 August & Tuesday 1 September

The second scheduled College Photograph Day is due to be held on Monday 31st August and Tuesday 1st September 2020.  Due to the extreme heat …

view ARTICLE

College Photo Days – Monday 31 August & Tuesday 1 September

The second scheduled College Photograph Day is due to be held on Monday 31st August and Tuesday 1st September 2020.  Due to the extreme heat experienced on our first photo day early in the year, a number of photographs needed to be postponed.  Consequently, due to the large number of photographs to be taken this time, we have had to schedule the photographs to be taken over two days.  Please see below the schedules for both days.

Monday 31 August ScheduleCLICK HERE

Tuesday 1 September ScheduleCLICK HERE

 

 

Business is booming in Year 9/10 featured image

Business is booming in Year 9/10

Photo caption: Judging panel, Aidan Ryan (Year 12), Mrs Helen Bohm and Ms Amy Woodgate Mrs Louise Ratcliffe | Business Teacher Anyone for Tasty Treats …

view ARTICLE

Business is booming in Year 9/10

Photo caption: Judging panel, Aidan Ryan (Year 12), Mrs Helen Bohm and Ms Amy Woodgate

Mrs Louise Ratcliffe | Business Teacher

Anyone for Tasty Treats or Wacky Waffles?  How about some Lit Sticks to keep you warm or custom face masks to keep you Covid safe?

Term 3 has been abuzz in the Year 9/10 Business classrooms as groups of students developed business ideas that they would have the opportunity to run in the school community as part of the inaugural RYOB program – “Run Your Own Business”.

This week saw the culmination of 6 weeks work as groups competed against each other to secure one of the 2 spots in their class to have the experience of running their own business.  Each group had to pitch their idea to a panel of judges that included Mr Dobrenov, Ms Woodgate, Mrs Bohm and Year 12 Business student Aidan Ryan.

From Mrs Ratcliffe’s class, the judges were persuaded and wowed by:

  • Tasty Treats – brownies, fudge and rocky road by Alexis and Bryce Zerner, Luke Stephenson, Alex Naughten and Hanaka Parker; and
  • Wacky Waffles – homemade waffles with various tasty toppings by Lily Kruger, Chloe Wainwright, Olivia Lack, Georgia Moody and Kate McCarthy

From Mrs Stephenson’s class:

  • Mask It – custom made fabric face masks by Bridget Hardy, Alexandra Rickert, Zara Kruger, Sophie Poole, Sophie Brennan and Maddie Taylor; and
  • Lit Sticks – firewood and kindling by Percy Kruger, Hamish Swift, Dan Hughes, Gus Flint, Sam Wainwright and Jed Esson

To find out how you can support these new start-up businesses, check out their articles in this edition of the newsletter.

Wacky Waffles featured image

Wacky Waffles

Wacky Waffles are the perfect sweet treat, complete with a variety of toppings. Our operating details are as follows: When: Week 8,9 and 10 – …

view ARTICLE

Wacky Waffles

Wacky Waffles are the perfect sweet treat, complete with a variety of toppings.

Our operating details are as follows:

When: Week 8,9 and 10 – Monday and Wednesday lunchtimes

Where: Home Ec. room

Price: 1 waffle with toppings for $4 and 2 waffles with toppings for $6

Senior school teachers: pre-ordered waffles will be available with an order form provided in the staff room that will need to be handed into Mrs Hobbs by the Friday prior.

~ Every waffle you buy is an automatic entry into a raffle to win a lolly jar ~

Lit Sticks featured image

Lit Sticks

Winter may nearly be over, but that doesn’t mean the cold has gone for good!  Allow Lit Sticks to keep you warm and fuel your …

view ARTICLE

Lit Sticks

Winter may nearly be over, but that doesn’t mean the cold has gone for good!  Allow Lit Sticks to keep you warm and fuel your fire with quality Australian hardwood.  Great for the fire pit, wood heaters or traditional outdoor barbeques.

Cost: $15 for a 20Kg bag which will be delivered to the College for your collection.

Pre order your firewood from litsticks93@gmail.com

Tasty Treats – selling throughout Week 8-10 featured image

Tasty Treats – selling throughout Week 8-10

Do you have the craving for some delicious treats? Why not order some Brownies, Rocky Road or Caramel fudge? 5 pieces for just $3.50. Using …

view ARTICLE

Tasty Treats – selling throughout Week 8-10

Do you have the craving for some delicious treats? Why not order some Brownies, Rocky Road or Caramel fudge? 5 pieces for just $3.50.

Using the order form attached, write your name, year level and selected amount of product and submit the form and money (in an envelope) to Mrs Hobbs or one of our members (Hanaka Parker, Bryce Zerner, Alexis Zerner, Luke Stephenson and Alex Naughten) by 3pm Friday each week to receive your Tasty Treats on the following Monday!

If you can’t print the order forms come visit us down in front of the LRC to collect a printed copy on Mondays and Tuesdays at Morning Tea or Lunch time.

Tasty Treats is a business that was formed in Year 9 and 10 Business and Economics as a part of this term’s topic: Run your own business. We will be operating from Week 8 until Week 10 Monday. If you would like some of our treats, please submit your form by 3pm Friday Week 9 (9/9/2020) as ordering closes that afternoon! If you have any queries or concerns, feel free to contact any of our members via email or SEQTA direct messages.

Thank you!

Mask It featured image

Mask It

Get yourself a face mask for only $5 to help slow the spread of COVID-19! Year 9 and 10 Business student explored the ‘seed’ and …

view ARTICLE

Mask It

Get yourself a face mask for only $5 to help slow the spread of COVID-19!

Year 9 and 10 Business student explored the ‘seed’ and ‘start-up’ stage of running a business. Working in groups, everyone presented their pitch about why their business was the most viable and worthy of an opportunity to start-up, making profit from people in the school community.

The MaskIt company is looking for any students, staff or parents/guardians who are interested in purchasing a handmade face mask. This product is offered in many different variations of colour and patterns ranging from the traditional Scots colours of cardinal and navy to a floral or camouflage grey (and many more!).

How to buy:

Find us on the Junior School steps on a Tuesday and Wednesday morning from 8am and on Thursday afternoons. The MaskIt business will be running until the end of term.

Pre-order forms are also an option when looking to purchase a mask. These forms can be found in the Junior, Middle and Senior School office, in the Senior Staff room and with us at our pop-up shop (pre-order forms can be downloaded here). Once completed, please hand back to the administrators in the above offices or to us at the Junior School steps and we’ll get your order to you as soon as possible!

Electronic submission of pre-order forms will also be accepted – please email teammaskit2020@gmail.com

Come along and purchase a mask and remember, ‘mask your face and embrace!’

Aspire to Health featured image

Aspire to Health

A small group of our Year 10 students had the opportunity to be part of the annual ‘Aspire to Health’ day that was held at …

view ARTICLE

Aspire to Health

A small group of our Year 10 students had the opportunity to be part of the annual ‘Aspire to Health’ day that was held at the Warwick Hospital last week.

The Aspire to Health program is in its fourth year being delivered at Warwick and is run jointly by Queensland Rural Medical Education Ltd, Department of Education, Small Business and Training, Griffith University, USQ and The University of Queensland.  The program enables high school students in Year 10 from the region to participate in simulated clinical learning, which is usually only available to University medical students.

During the day, the students had the opportunity to speak with university students and a range of practising health professionals in areas such as Nursing, Midwifery, Medicine, Paramedicine, Occupational Therapy, Speech Pathology, Dietician and Allied Health workers about their career choices and pathways to medicine.

As always, it was a thoroughly enjoyable and informative day, especially when the students were able to take part in the clinical scenarios where they were able to participate in practical sessions to learn about CPR, suturing, plastering and Allied Health skills.

 

Another Destructive Move: The Australian Government Announces Plans to Alter Australian University Fees featured image

Another Destructive Move: The Australian Government Announces Plans to Alter Australian University Fees

During Term 3, our Year 10 English students have been researching and writing feature articles on topics of their choice, as part of their “Literature …

view ARTICLE

Another Destructive Move: The Australian Government Announces Plans to Alter Australian University Fees

During Term 3, our Year 10 English students have been researching and writing feature articles on topics of their choice, as part of their “Literature in the Media” unit. The quality of work being submitted by our students is absolutely outstanding. Please enjoy some feature articles from our students.


Another Destructive Move: The Australian Government Announces Plans to Alter Australian University Fees

Eliana Jones investigates the proposed amendments to Australian universities, and the repercussions this unjustified move will cause.  

On Friday the 19th of June, Education Minister Dan Tehan announced the proposed changes to Australian university fees, fulfilling the hopes of some and extinguishing the dreams of many. The change in fees, proposed to start in 2021, favour often falsely idolised STEM courses, and brutally intensify the cost of degrees in the arts and humanities. Most arts and humanities degrees are expected to rise in cost by a shocking 113%. Degrees in law will increase by 30%, whilst university courses in teaching, nursing, clinical psychology, science, health, maths, architecture, IT, engineering and English will decrease by as much as 62%. The proposed fee adjustments for 2021 should be withdrawn immediately, in order to prevent the inevitable destruction of our humanities and arts sectors, and to protect the future of the Australian workforce.

The sudden and abrupt announcement by the Australian Government regarding the changes in university fees has not only been completely irrational, but has also been justified using false claims. In his announcement on Friday, Dan Tehan stated that the intent behind changing the cost of university fees was to incentivise students to take “job-relevant” STEM courses. Tehan went on to remark, “A cheaper degree in an area where there’s a job is a win-win for students”. Inevitably, these statements were met with outrage from citizens across Australia, with the National Union of Students responding, “this move is at the expense of hundreds of thousands of young people who have chosen to study a degree that the government doesn’t deem ‘worthy’ enough”. The claims made by Tehan in his speech implying that humanities and arts courses will not lead to jobs, however, are completely false. Australian Government data from the previous year has proven that courses in areas such as humanities and law actually have far greater employment rates than those in maths, science and IT, verifying that the claims made but Tehan are completely false and unjustified. The use of incorrect data to justify political statements is not only extremely misleading but is also completely unjust, as it confirms that this sudden change in government funding is for a purpose other than benefiting the Australian workforce. With humanities and law careers being in-demand and having high employment rates, why attempt to steer potential students away? The proposed change in university funding appears to have little to do with preparing students for sustainable careers. An underlying issue may be the source of this sudden attack towards the humanities and arts sectors, and it is vital that the proposed fee adjustments do not go ahead in order to protect Australia’s future workforce.

The alteration of Australian university fees is unquestionably a result of the Australian Government’s animosity towards the arts and humanities sectors. The arts and humanities have not only suffered enormously during the COVID-19 outbreak, but also seem to be under constant attack by the leaders of our country. From February this year, the Australian arts portfolio was dismissed by Prime Minister Scott Morrison, the arts sector now falling into a portfolio in charge of infrastructure, transport, communications and regional development. When discussing his plans for this new portfolio, the Scott Morrison gave detailed descriptions of future strategies for improving communications, infrastructure and regional Australia. The PM, however, did not mention the arts once. The altering of Australian university fees is nothing but another childish attempt by the Australian Government to devalue the arts. Considering that the arts contributes an enormous $111.7 billion to the Australian economy each year (Baker, 2019), why else discourage the next generation to pursue a career in this sector? The manipulative nature of the changes in university fees is further demonstrated through humanities degrees increasing by approximately 113%. Humanities degrees teach students to analyse, evaluate and question events and societal norms, earning their students the reputation of being the ‘thinkers’ of our society. Joel Barnes, public history researcher at the University of Technology Sydney, has described the sudden price hike in humanities degrees as a by-product of a “decades old” enmity against humanities driven by those who perceive them “as generally antagonistic to political interests”. The potential changes in university fees seem to have an underlying strategy behind them, that seeks to devalue the arts and discourage Australians from contradicting the government. The changes in Australian university fees are unjust, and must be withdrawn in order to protect our economy and our society.

The humanities and arts are not only important in our current society, but will become even more vital in the years to come. Research from LinkedIn from the previous year has shown that the top three ‘soft skills’ sought after by employers are creativity, persuasion and collaboration. Arts and humanities studies place an abundance of importance on developing these skills, and often produce extremely employable graduates. With the amount of technology and artificial intelligence in our society only increasing, humanities graduates are becoming more sought after than ever by technology companies. Top executives from Microsoft write, “As computers behave more like humans, the social sciences and humanities will become even more important. Languages, art, history, economics, ethics, philosophy, psychology and human development courses can teach critical, philosophical and ethics-based skills that will be instrumental in the development and management of AI solutions.” Humanities and arts studies are essential for the future development of Australia. The proposed adjustment of Australian university fees must not go ahead, in order to protect the future of Australia and its workforce.

The proposed university fee adjustments for 2021 must be withdrawn immediately. The decision itself to alter the fees has not only been entirely irrational, but has also contradicted current data showing the humanities and arts studies are certainly, ‘job relevant’. It appears the only motivation behind this new government move is to attempt to undermine and diminish the humanities and arts sectors within Australia. The humanities and arts sectors are vital for our workforce, economy and nation. The arts and humanities provide enrichment in our daily lives, and should be protected, rather than left neglected by the Australian Government.

 

 

Tutoring Sessions Available to Students featured image

Tutoring Sessions Available to Students

If your child would like to take advantage of any extra tutoring, the timetable below outlines sessions our academic staff members are currently running. To …

view ARTICLE

Tutoring Sessions Available to Students

If your child would like to take advantage of any extra tutoring, the timetable below outlines sessions our academic staff members are currently running. To download a PDF version of this document, please click here

Father’s Day Stall featured image

Father’s Day Stall

It’s not long until Father’s Day and we begin to wonder… ‘what shall I get dad?’.  To help with that special gift choice, the P&F …

view ARTICLE

Father’s Day Stall

It’s not long until Father’s Day and we begin to wonder… ‘what shall I get dad?’.  To help with that special gift choice, the P&F will be running a Father’s Day Stall for the Prep to Year 5 children with around 20 different gift choices.

When:  Wednesday 2 September.

Where: Wilf Arthur Learning Enrichment Centre (WALEC)

Gifts:  There will be $5 and $10 gifts

Further details will follow but for now, please mark the Father’s Day stall in your calendar (2 September).

 

Rugby 7s Canteen Helpers Needed! featured image

Rugby 7s Canteen Helpers Needed!

The SCOTS PGC Rugby 7’s Carnival is planned for September 5 2020 and the P&F would like to run a canteen. To make this happen …

view ARTICLE

Rugby 7s Canteen Helpers Needed!

The SCOTS PGC Rugby 7’s Carnival is planned for September 5 2020 and the P&F would like to run a canteen.

To make this happen we need YOU!

It is an all-day event and last year proved to be very successful.  Are you available to come and join our Canteen Convenor, Toni Crawford for the day, or even a few hours?

We are aiming to have the barbeque running for the day to sell burgers and a sausage sizzle so we need to fill the following positions:

  • BBQ Master (1 or 2 people)
  • Burger artists (2 people)
  • Counter server/money taker
  • Hot chip cooker

Home bakers – we need you too! If you can contribute some tasty treats for the day, please let Toni know by phone or message to 0438 810 150.

If you’re able to spare your time to help out in any capacity, please let Toni know as soon as possible.  The ordering and stocking of the canteen will need to happen very soon and we’ll need a team to make this day happen.

 

Year 12 Homestyle Bake Pie Drive featured image

Year 12 Homestyle Bake Pie Drive

Stash some ready-made meals in the freezer this winter and grab some sweet treats for dessert! Support the Year 12 Fundraiser by ordering some Homestyle …

view ARTICLE

Year 12 Homestyle Bake Pie Drive

Stash some ready-made meals in the freezer this winter and grab some sweet treats for dessert!

Support the Year 12 Fundraiser by ordering some Homestyle Bake Products. You can now order online at homestylebake.com.au and selecting Order Online. Register using your details and enter our fundraiser code FSCOTSPGCCOWAR110920. Orders close on Wednesday 2 September for pickup on Friday 11 September between 2:45 pm and 3:30 pm from the Assembly Hall (or by arrangement).

Collect orders from friends, family and work colleagues and add new orders to your account to allow for easy collection. A short online ordering video is available here.

Every order helps the Year 12 cohort in their fundraising efforts.