Message from our Chaplain

It was a nostalgic time when I finally hung up my rugby boots. I was always busy to build this rugby career. In some ways I never finished the project as I never made the Springbok side. That’s not the only thing a parent intends to build and never get done. In fact, many of us parents knew how we wanted our family to be – how we still want it to be – but somehow the home, the family we intended to build never got finished did it? Even as our children were leaving our home, we talked about how quickly the years had melted away and how we were feeling there was so much unfinished business in our kids’ lives. Maybe in your relationship with your children there are a lot of things you wish you had done, or a lot of things you wish you hadn’t done.

The intentions were good, but something happened along the way. Your children may still be fairly young, still at home, but already you have regrets about what has or hasn’t happened in your relationship – in their lives. But it isn’t over yet. In fact, the Bible offers a blueprint for hope and for healing. If you can find the courage to activate this powerful step, you may still be able to take care of some of that unfinished business. God says in James 5: 16, “Confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.” Let’s apply this to a broken, strained or a hurting family relationship – a part of your home that never got finished. God is calling you to fervent prayer for that person in your heart. And He is calling us to “confess our sins to each other”, too. In the case of your son or daughter, that probably means saying some of the hardest words in the English language for a parent to say, “I was wrong. Please forgive me.”

For someone you love, just the recognition that you were wrong could start a healing process in both of you. Tell them you’re sorry for any way you have failed them; that you want the future to be different from the past; give them the “I love you” that they may have been waiting for a long time. Give them your blessing, your approval, your praise. They may have been starved for it for years. It’s never too late to say, “I love you.” It’s never too late to say, “I’m sorry.” It’s never too late to say, “Let’s make a new beginning.” Oh, it will take some humility, because it’s pride that keeps walls from coming down. It will take God’s courage, but it could heal so much in you and so much in that person, you love. But the home, the family, the relationship you never finished can still be built if you can say three life-changing, life-giving words, “I was wrong.”

Blessings, Rev Willie