Supporting Our Children

Kyle Thompson | Principal

Parenting is one, if not the, hardest, most complex, yet most rewarding ‘jobs’ you can have. Every day requires energy, and more energy, diplomatic skill greater than many UN ambassadors, the skills and understanding of a referee who not only understands the rules, but also understands the game and the ability to figure it out as we go. There is no handbook, no licence requirements, and to top it off, an ever changing world that perhaps, as parents, we may struggle to keep up to date and at terms with. Even writing this introduction is challenging because how does one describe or wrap up parenting in words?

In being a parent, what is it that our kids want from us? And, not just in simple terms of food, shelter and safety. What is it we can be doing for them as they navigate their way through school, particularly the high school years when thrust upon them is the reality that all this ‘stuff’ they have been doing at school finally counts (yes, I know, this should not have come as a surprise to them but it always seems to).

Last week, I was able to read a report from The Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY) on what today’s teenagers want their parents to be saying and doing, as they navigate the stressors of their senior years. The report, aptly titled “Please Say You’re Proud of Me” found that students in years 10-12 experienced tension between asserting their independence while still wanting and needing the support and guidance of parents in their education and future. The report shows that parental support is a key factor in them doing well and setting the foundation for their futures. This is not to say that the parents’ job is to solve all their problems or to run interference on some of the challenges that will present themselves during this stage of schooling.

So how much involvement do our boys and girls want? There are four consistent themes in the report:

  1. Parents focussing on the positive, expressing pride in the child’s achievements and accepting who they are as a person
  2. Reminding them that you love them unconditionally and are always there for them
  3. Offering practical guidance in tackling stresses and other problems at school and in life in general
  4. Encouragement and support in allowing them to follow their own aspirations and make their own decisions for their futures, rather than being pressured into pursuing their parents’ dreams.

Students in the report acknowledged the importance of academics but articulated that success was broader than just academic results. Success for them included establishing and maintaining friendships, developing life skills and doing well in co-curricular activities. Many students also noted the pressure to do well adversely affected their mental health and the maintenance of a healthy balance between study, friends and family life.

In engaging with our boys and girls, this can be as simple as talking to them in regards to what challenged them at school today, discussing news items, discussing their homework or perhaps most importantly, listening to their views.

In short, our boys and girls need and will continue to need the support of their families as they progress through their senior schooling. As care givers, finding the balance of support, developing independence, and articulating our unconditional care for them are the ingredients for a successful outcome for our students, in whatever guise that is to take.

From the Co-curricular Desk

T3W6 Sport Fixtures T3W6 Co-curricular Programme Mr Tom Bradbury | Assistant Director of Co-curricular Activities QCIS ATHLETICS CARNIVAL Congratulations to all on the fantastic effort …

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From the Co-curricular Desk

T3W6 Sport Fixtures

T3W6 Co-curricular Programme

Mr Tom Bradbury | Assistant Director of Co-curricular Activities

QCIS ATHLETICS CARNIVAL

Congratulations to all on the fantastic effort on Monday at the QCIS Athletics.

In the Aggregate, we finished a creditable third place above Downlands College and Concordia College.  We were just 42 points behind TAS in second place with the overwhelmingly strong ATC and Brigidine combination just too strong for us all in first.

This fantastic effort in the Aggregate made it easy for us to take the Average trophy with the smallest school population in the competition – a great effort from all to secure this title. Next year our eyes will be fixed on toppling TAS in the Aggregate race.

We congratulate the following students for their record breaking performances in their respective age group events as follows:

Hayley Wainwright – 200m, Long Jump, High Jump

Nicholas Denny – 200m, 100m, Long Jump, Shot Put

Beau Kendall – Javelin

Samuel Wainwright – Long Jump, Triple Jump

Kira Holmes – Javelin

William Gilmore – Discus

Again, thank you to all those who contributed to our success and congratulations on our collective and your individual triumphs.

 

Border District Athletics

The busy week of events continued on Thursday with the Border District Carnival held at Warwick SHS. The day brought success across several events with outstanding individual performances recorded in all age groups.

In the race for the Aggregate Trophy, Warwick State High School took out the title with 463 points.  We were close behind on 420 points with Assumption bringing up third place some distance back. Allora pipped us for the Average trophy this year, but all was not lost with our individual students figuring in the Age Championship results as listed below.

Harry Mayall and Samuel Wainwright shared a three way tie for the 13 years Age Champion. Cooper Seng was Runner up in the 15 years Boys Age Championship. Shona McFarland dominated with her sheer weight of events and dogged determination to take the 16 years Girls Age Championship. Finally, in the Senior Age Championship Caitlin Skaines and Samuel Proudlove both took the top honour to round out a superb performance from what was a reasonably small team.

Other individuals to shine on the day included Ewan McFarland and Zara Kruger in their respective 3000m events, while Mackenzie Mayall was outstanding dominating many track events in the 15 years age group. Harry Mayall was a standout performer in the 13 years 100m, 200m and 400m but really shone as a last minute substitution in the Open Boys Relay, who were narrowly defeated by WSHS on the line. Shona’s PB in the High Jump was one to behold, and Chloe Wainwright was a leading light for the 15 years’ girls.

The greatest highlight for me as team manager was seeing so many of our great students chipping in and having a go to fill vacated spots due to illness or injury. This selflessness and service to their school is what SCOTS PGC is all about and I thank all for the part they played.

Finally, a huge thank you goes out to our Gap students Jeremy, Scott, Alyssa and Sophia for their work as team managers and track officials and to Mr Wilson and Mr Campbell for their support and work with the team and out officiating the shot put.

 

 

 

Queensland School Sport 10-12yrs Track and Field

In news from the State Championships in Brisbane, Nicholas Denny has pulled off the performance of the year to grasp the bronze in the 12 years Boys 100m Final, whilst Bailey Harm has finished 6th in the 11 years High Jump.

Hayley and Riley Wainwright sit reasonably placed in the Combined event after the 100m and Long Jump and will contest the Shot Put and the 800m tomorrow to finalise this event.

Tanner Henley and Ellyse Kruger were yet to throw in their events at the time of compiling this report so we eagerly await their results.

 

Warwick All Schools Athletics

Next Thursday 22 August, SCOTS PGC hosts the 2019 Warwick All Schools Athletics involving Year 7-12 students in the 12 years to 17/18 years age divisions. Pre events will be held on Wednesday afternoon commencing at 3.45pm and the main day commences at 9.00am Thursday. Spectators are welcome and a canteen will be in operation.

 

SWQ All Schools Touch

On Sunday 18 August three SCOTS PGC Touch Teams will take on the best of the South West schools in the annual Touch Carnival at Kearneys Spring, Toowoomba. We wish the Under 15 Boys, Under 15 Girls and Under 18 Mixed Teams all the very best at this event. With positions in the Open Mixed Team for Queensland All Schools at stake all players will be trying their best to impress. Games commence at 8.45am and the team is departing at 7.00am.

Gym Closures

Due to dwindling numbers on Monday and Tuesday mornings the Gym will be closed until warmer weather brings out our gym goers once again. The Gym will remain open on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday mornings for the remainder of the term.

EQ News

Georgia Rohde | Equestrian Captain Our Equestrian team had a very quiet weekend, which is quite unusual if you compare it to the many other …

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EQ News

Georgia Rohde | Equestrian Captain

Our Equestrian team had a very quiet weekend, which is quite unusual if you compare it to the many other busy weekends we have already experienced this term.

Nevertheless, we are still committed to training and practice and are happy to report that a few of our students are heading to the Ekka over the course of the weekend and early next week to compete in various events.  In addition, we also have two of our students setting off to ride at the Tamworth One-day event which is also scheduled for this weekend.

A reminder that registrations for the Kim and Jess Sammon Campdraft Clinic need to be forwarded to our Equestrian Coordinator, Grace Buchholz as soon as possible, please.

Grace can be contacted by phoning the College reception 07 4666 9811 or email grace.buchholz@scotspgc.com.au

 

Year 9s experience Outward Bound

Mr Jonathon Fender | Outdoor Education Coordinator Our Year 9 class set off an outdoor education experience during Week 3 this term.  The Outward Bound …

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Year 9s experience Outward Bound

Mr Jonathon Fender | Outdoor Education Coordinator

Our Year 9 class set off an outdoor education experience during Week 3 this term.  The Outward Bound camp is designed to challenge our students to utilise and build on their teamwork skills to work through a series of outdoor activities.  Students learn more about themselves, their physical strengths and their ability to navigate situations that might not always be within their comfort zones.  We asked some of our students to reflect on their Outward Bound experience, here’s what they had to say:

Outward Bound Camp was an eye-opening experience for all.  We participated in activities such as hiking with our packs on that contained all of our gear for the few days we were away. We went mountain biking and climbed Big Ben, the massive tree. While we were away we learned that teamwork is so important not just while climbing trees but in fact for everyday activities. While breakfast was supplied for us, we had to prepare all our other meals. This is where we used our teamwork skills as some cut up the food and others cleaned up. Overall, I think our tutor group (9.2) enjoyed the mountain biking the most as there were so many hills to go up and down! Our instructor, Jenny, was great too as she introduced us to some fun games to play around the campfire at night. – Alexandra Rickett

 

One of the activities I took part in on camp was a hike.  We had to walk along dirt trails up and down hills and through the bush.  We were in groups of two or three people and for a certain part of the hike each group had the map and were in charge of navigation.  This meant they had to lead the rest of us to the next destination on the hike.  The trail was approximately 8 kilometres long and consisted of very dense terrain.

What I took away from this camping activity, were the skills to read a map and navigate a trail.  I also learned the ‘good old’ lesson of: If you try your hardest at something and don’t give up when it gets tough you will succeed at it.  I also learned to always help others when they need help and also to accept help if it is offered and you need it. – Juliana Cox

 

On the Wednesday morning of Week 3, the Year 9 class set off for Outward Bound.  Once we arrived, the first thing we did was divide into our tutor groups and pack our gear into our hiking packs.  We needed to carry all of our clothes and supplies for the next three days.  Shortly afterwards we had lunch, then began our walk towards our first camping site.  Once we arrived, we were told that our first activity was to climb Big Ben.  Big Ben was a tree not far from our campsite, which we all climbed while attached to a rope.  The climb certainly exercised our patience and team work skills.

Our activities over the next couple of days included an eight kilometre hike, mountain biking, as well as team building activities. Outward Bound allowed us to learn an abundance of new skills and helped us to get to know each other more. – Eliana Jones

Year One Need your Coles Minis!

Once again, Year One are on the hunt for the Coles mini shop collectables for use in their mathematics program.  If you are a Coles …

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Year One Need your Coles Minis!

Once again, Year One are on the hunt for the Coles mini shop collectables for use in their mathematics program.  If you are a Coles shopper our Year 1 students would be grateful for any collectable you are willing to part with. Please drop items to Reception or the JAM Office.

Community Notices

 

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Community Notices